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Blog Posts By NEA Health Information Network

By NEA HIN staff

A severe allergic reaction, or what’s called anaphylaxis, can be really serious and even life-threatening.

It can happen at anytime and anywhere – in the classroom, cafeteria, playground, on the bus or during a field trip. So it's critical that ALL school employees, including teachers and education support professionals, know about allergic reactions, how to identify them, how to respond in an emergency, and how they can help prevent them in the first place.

That's why NEA HIN and Sanofi US teamed up to create a video for educators and education support professionals on managing severe allergies in school. Watch the video below, and then head over to our allergy page for more information and resources on severe allergies and anaphylaxis. ...

By NEA and NEA HIN staff

Summer is officially here, and most schools across the nation have marked the end of another academic year.

For many kids, the coming of summer signals little more than a seasonal shift from one set of scheduled, adult-supervised lessons and activities to another.

But the more time children spend in these structured, parent-guided activities, the worse their ability to work productively towards self-directed goals.

Unscheduled, unsupervised playtime is one of the most valuable educational opportunities we give our children. It is fertile ground; the place where children strengthen social bonds, build emotional maturity, develop cognitive skills, and shore up their physical health. ...

By Jenn Kauffman, NEA Health Information Network

"She's blue!"

I was three-years-old, and my mother had minutes before given me a walnut to snack on as I rode in the backseat during a family road trip. I was suddenly quiet - unusually so for a talkative toddler - and when she turned around, she realized I had stopped breathing.

I was experiencing anaphylaxis - a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction. My reaction had been triggered by a tree nut food allergy - one of the 8 most common food allergy triggers in the U.S.

Food allergies can be a scary event not only for the estimated 15 million Americans like me who have a food allergy, but also for family, educators, co-workers and friends who witness an allergic reaction. Awareness, education and prevention can literally save a life.  The National Education Association Health Information Network produced "The Food Allergy Book" in English and in Spanish to help school staff and families be prepared in the case of ...

By Jenn Kauffman, NEA Health Information Network

For middle school and high school communities, May can often bring anxiety and stress in the form of year-end testing and senior projects.

Stress isn't just limited to adults. A survey by the American Psychological Association found that teens experience stress, too - and their stress levels rival that of adults.

Even positive events can be stressful. And while stress can help people achieve peak performance - too much stress can impair performance and be harmful to health. ...

By Libby Nealis, Behavioral Health Consultant, NEA Health Information Network

, NEA Health Information Network

When suicide is the third leading cause of death among youth as young as 10 through age 19, it is crucial that our school districts have proactive suicide prevention policies in place.

Anytime we lose a young person to suicide is one time too many.  Tragically, most of today’s school shootings end not only in injury and death of innocent students and school staff, but also in the ultimate self-inflicted gun shots and suicide of the perpetrators of these violent events.  Therefore, our efforts to reduce school and community violence and ensure student and staff safety in our schools must also include an understanding of suicide prevention and what is involved in the identification and referral of students at risk of suicide.  ...

NEA strongly encourages members to include suicide prevention, alertness, and intervention and postvention programs in the ongoing professional development and educator preparation programs for teachers, education support professionals, and

By Libby Nealis, Project Consultant, NEA Health Information Network

The problem of prescription drug misuse and abuse by adults has been growing for years, but its recent increase within the adolescent population is alarming.  According to a 2010 survey, one in four adolescents has abused a prescription medication at some point in their lives, which is up from one in five teens in 2009.

In growing numbers, more adolescents are abusing prescription drugs than they are illegal drugs.  With the exception of marijuana, prescription drugs are the drug of choice among 12-13 year olds.  The prescription drugs that teens most commonly abuse or misuse are painkillers, stimulants (like medications taken for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD) and depressants (like anti-anxiety medications).  These medications are often easily accessible, sometimes from a parent’s medicine cabinet.  In fact, 64% of teens (age 12-17) who abuse prescription pain relievers say they got them from friends or relatives.

Schools can play an important role in combatting this growing and dangerous trend.  All educators, particularly those who most frequently work with at-risk populations, should be aware of the changing patterns of prescription drug misuse and abuse within ...

By Jamila Goodman, Program Coordinator, NEA Health Information Network

Did you know that adolescents are more likely than young adults to become dependent on prescription medication?  The Office of National Drug Control Policy calls prescription drug abuse “the Nation’s fastest growing drug problem.” The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has classified prescription drug abuse as an epidemic. The problem of prescription drug abuse and misuse is particularly alarming among young people. ...

By Lisa Sharma Creighton, Senior Program Coordinator, Nutrition, Hunger and Physical Activity, NEA Health Information Network

The holiday season is known for serving up sugary treats like cookies, pies and hot chocolate, but with a little preparation and creativity, schools and parents can ensure that kids also have healthy and tasty options, too. Check out our top tips for intertwining healthy foods and physical activity into this month’s holiday celebrations:

1. Make healthy, holiday-themed snacks
Some of our favorite recipes include:

2. Skip sugary beverages 
Kate Uslan of the Alliance for a Healthier Generation suggests serving fruit-infused water in place of ...

By Lisa Sharma Creighton, Senior Program Coordinator, Nutrition, Hunger and Physical Activity, NEA Health Information Network

With Thanksgiving just a couple days away, now is the perfect time to start planning for a healthy and happy holiday. To help you get organized, we rounded up our favorite healthy Thanksgiving tips, like involving kids in cooking nutritious dishes, getting the whole family moving before and after the meal, and more:

Involve kids in cooking the Thanksgiving meal
Parents can bring kids grocery shopping (extra credit: consider using a pedometer to measure steps), and then have them help with easy meal prep, like washing vegetables or measuring dry ingredients. Cooking together can be a great time to reinforce healthy eating habits and show children first-hand how nutritious dishes can be very delicious. Here are a couple of our favorite nutritious holiday recipes: ...

By Liesel Kuhr, Business and Finance Manager, NEA Health Information Network

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) finally defined what it means for food to be labeled “gluten free”.  This new rule is great news for people with a gluten intolerance or celiac disease. Under the new rules, which will become fully effective in a year, consumers can trust that packaged foods sold in the U.S. and labeled “gluten free” meet the safety standards enforced by FDA.  For more information on celiac disease, the new rules, and FDA labeling, visit FDA.gov. ...