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By Gerard J. Puccio and Julia Figliotti, for the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21)

Proving Creativity Is an Essential Skill

Organizations everywhere are shouting from the rooftops. They are calling for innovation and imagination in our schools and demanding innovation and imagination in the workplace. The essence of it all: creativity is finally being recognized as a must-have, 21st century work skill.

At the International Center for Studies in Creativity (ICSC), we believe it is more than just a work skill. Creativity is a necessity at the workplace, in a home environment and everywhere in between. To cope with the ever-present change in our modern world, creativity has become an essential life skill for all.

Resistance Remains

However, in spite of the clarion call for creativity, there is still some resistance to the view that creativity is a skill that can be developed. In our opinion, there are two major impediments to the integration of creativity into businesses, education and society. The first obstacle is probably the most obvious: while many business leaders tout the importance of creativity in their employees, our educational systems seem to be leaning in the opposite ...

By Jim Hull, Senior Policy Analyst, National School Boards Association’s Center for Public Education (CPE)

With 80 percent of students graduating within four-years of entering high school, the Class of 2012 achieved the highest on-time graduation rate in U.S. history according to the 2014 Building a Grad Nation report. After graduation rates languished in the low 70s for nearly four decades, rates have accelerated dramatically since 2006, improving by eight percentage points in just six years. According to the report, if this rate of improvement continues the national graduation rate will reach 90 percent by 2020, a goal of the authors of Grad Nation.

While attainment gaps remain, the gap is narrowing between traditionally disadvantaged students and their more advantaged peers. This is particularly true for the fastest growing group of students in our nation’s schools, Hispanics, whose graduation rate jumped from 61 percent to 76 percent between 2006 and ...

By Sharon P. Robinson, President and Chief Executive Officer, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE)

A new report from the National Network of State Teachers of the Year (NNSTOY), in partnership with the Center on Great Teachers and Leaders (GTL Center) at American Institutes for Research and five leading national education organizations, including AACTE, was released on April 30. This collaborative approach to research provided an opportunity for teachers and education partners to address the question, “How does the profession support teachers’ development overtime?” The Council of Chief State School Officers hosted a release event featuring a panel discussion by teacher leaders, researchers, and policy makers about the report’s findings

Insights in the report, From Good to Great: Exemplary Teachers Share Perspectives on Increasing Teacher Effectiveness Across the Career Continuum, are based on an exploratory survey of more than 300 national and state teachers of the year. This research identifies valuable professional experiences and supports that were essential to these exemplar teachers’ professional growth and effectiveness throughout various stages of their career. Teachers responded to survey questions relevant to four stages of the teacher career continuum, identified as ...

By Gail Connelly, Executive Director, National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP)

Educators may continue to argue about the best methods to measure student performance. But most of us agree that achievement gaps resulting from race and socioeconomic status are a moral imperative that educators have a responsibility to address.

We know that principals play a key role in closing achievement gaps. Research over the past 30 years shows that strong school leadership is second only to teaching among school influences on student success and is most significant in schools with the greatest need.

As the role of the principal expands, and becomes more and more complex, it may help to keep a focus on four key things that principals can do to improve learning conditions for students and create a school culture that helps close the gap:

1. Hire effective teachers. Here’s why Finland sits at the top of international rankings: It trains and supports teachers better than we do in the United States. For one, teacher education in Finland is a five-year, university-based program, with emphasis on ...

Students who fail to graduate – dropouts who perhaps more appropriately should be described as over-age and under-credited – exemplify the significant hurdles that come with the commitment to educate all students. These young individuals have fallen through the cracks, and once they’ve left the school setting, it’s difficult to re-engage them. Yet some efforts to find, support and ultimately prepare these students for future success in the postsecondary environment are showing impressive results. This work is an important reminder that it takes a village – and committed collaboration among key groups of stakeholders – to create a truly comprehensive system. ...

Earlier this month the Learning First Alliance (LFA) issued a public statement advocating for more time, support and resources for implementing Common Core State Standards (CCSS), a set of college and career ready standards developed collaboratively under the leadership of the National Governors Association (NGA) and the Council for Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), before using assessments aligned with the new standards for a variety of public accountability purposes. I also posted here on this blog advocating that position. In addition, my colleague, LFA Deputy Director Anne O’Brien, has posted on building support for the standards on Edutopia. And both of us received comments on the evils of CCSS and the wrongheadedness of our support, in any fashion, for the standards.

I have to admit, I’ve been surprised by the passion and anger our posts engendered and the energy of those few folks who have commented on our entries – energy that could be directed in more constructive ways. However, that aside, here are some of my responses to those comments:

  • “CCSS are just a move by the federal government to control what our children learn”
    • Having grown up in the Washington, DC, area and traveled the country visiting schools and districts as part of my various professional positions at national education organizations, I’m always amazed that anyone could think the federal government has the ability to dictate thought
    ...

By Rich Bagin, APR, Executive Director, National School Public Relations Association (NSPRA)

The Education Writers Association (EWA) recently released the results of a survey of 190 journalist members of EWA entitled Mediated Access. The coverage of that study made communication professionals – they call them PIOs (a term less frequently used by NSPRA members these days) – look like obstacles rather than facilitators. One headline read, Education Reporters Slam Public Information Officers in Survey.

But if you step back and analyze the report itself, I think it represents a realistic snapshot of the mixed-bag of media relationships today. Possibly, another case of headline writers not reading the full report.

Indeed, this “slamming” survey notes that the relationships between journalists and communication professionals were fairly positive nearly 75% of the time. The exception was for a small number of instances in which reporters were not given interviews on their time schedule or were refused interviews at all. In these cases, the districts were described as practicing censorship.

Another critical finding was that the public is not getting all the information it needs because of barriers imposed by schools. About 76% of reporters agreed with that ...

By Jodi Alligood, American Federation of Teachers member and middle school science teacher and AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) coordinator at New Smyrna Beach Middle School in Volusia County, FL

Productive struggle. These are the two words that come to mind when thinking of my experiences with the Common Core in my classroom. And I am not just thinking of the students. If you are anything like me, your desks are straightened between periods, your stapler and tape dispenser have a home (and they are lined -up) and your students know that you don’t “do chaos.”  So, for me learning to let go of the reins and embrace the organized chaos that accompanies inquiry-based and problem-solving type learning was a struggle. Seeing what happened when I let the students inquire, speak to each other and bounce ideas around, and “steal” from other groups, I realized that my productive struggle had been worth it.

As far as the students go, their version of productive struggle was much different than mine. After all, if being social and chaotic was the goal for middle schoolers, my job would be much easier.  The students’ struggle came from the assignment of rigorous tasks and complex readings; and in understanding how to transfer what they learned in a given lesson to other tasks and even assessments. I can remember spending almost a full period on one short paragraph while reading about endothermic and exothermic reactions in science class. We spent time highlighting, underlining, making connections ...

By Anne Foster, Executive Director, Parents for Public Schools (PPS)

I hear a lot these days about how standardized, high-stakes testing has killed creativity and innovation in the classrooms of America. I can understand why so many people think this is true, because when tests are omnipresent, there is a huge amount of time spent in preparation, and this leaves less time for other ways of teaching. The right place for testing and the right amount of testing are relevant topics for parents today, and their voices should be heard in this debate.

But I continue to believe that there are wonderful teachers all over the country who still find ways to help their students learn in creative and innovative ways. I found one such teacher this week at Moss Haven Elementary School in Dallas, Texas, part of the Richardson Independent School District. Her name is Kim Aman, and she’s a special education teacher who created a farm and a chicken coop at the school. Moss Haven Elementary School promotes good nutrition and exercise and has partnered with the United Way and the Cooper Clinic in Dallas. Their efforts are really ...

By Kwok-Sze Wong, Ed.D., Executive Director, American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

Like most parents, my wife, Beverly, and I asked our son Tyler to call regularly when he went away to college. A few weeks into his first semester, Tyler started talking effusively about his classes and social life, topics he never discussed with us when he was in high school. We soon realized something amazing, almost miraculous, had happened. Tyler was excited about learning again. He told us the college structure was what he had wanted in high school. He was finally able to control his own education. He chose his own classes and his own schedule. He no longer had to sit through classes that held no interest or purpose for him.

We had another realization; Tyler didn’t do adolescence well. Tyler was generally happy in elementary school, but sometime in middle school, he became the dreaded teenager. For the next four years, he longed to fast-forward to the next stage of his life. Tyler was 13 going on 21.

In their book Switch: How to Change Things When Change is Hard, Chip and Dan Heath suggest that change can only occur when someone behaves differently. But what happens when change happens to a person and not because of that person? As adults we constantly contend with unexpected and sometimes unwanted change. Circumstances require ...

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