Learning First Alliance

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Technology and Learning

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By Jodie Pozo-Olano, Chief Communications Officer, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

Last week, the education stars aligned as the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions committee (HELP) passed, with bi-partisan support, a bill that would reauthorize the nation’s education law of the land – the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA). Although the path to final passage will surely be filled with lots of twists and turns, the action by the committee last week was a huge positive step forward.

What’s significant about this proposed bill?

Well, for starters, it contains a dedicated digital learning program. Many schools across the country still struggle with adequate connectivity (which has been addressed through additional E-Rate funding), access to devices and digital resources. These same school communities also often lack adequate funding to provide ongoing and varied professional learning opportunities for educators.

I-TECH is a step toward closing this gap ...

Deanna Martindale is a 2014 PDK Emerging Leader and principal at Hebron Elementary School in Ohio. She has spent nineteen years in education, teaching sixth grade, serving as a professional development coach, and helping plan one of the first K-12 STEM programs in her state.

She recently took some time to share her thoughts on STEM learning, engaging curriculum, preparing students for college-and-career, and connecting with parents, students and staff in support of student achievement.

Public School Insights (PSI): Thank you so much for taking the time to share your insights with us here at Learning First Alliance. First, would you share some of your professional background with us?   

This is my 19th year in education and my fourth year as an elementary principal. I have taught sixth grade, all subjects, and served as an instructional coach, working on assessment design and inquiry based teaching.  I also spent time as a professional development coordinator with the Teaching and Learning Collaborative, working some with COSI Columbus to develop an Inquiry Learning for Schools summer program for teachers. I conducted professional development around the state to help roll out Ohio’s new science standards and best instructional practices, and I was a STEM coordinator for Reynoldsburg schools, where I worked with a design team of teachers and administrators to plan one of the first K-12 STEM programs in the state ...

By Joan Richardson, Editor-in-Chief, Kappan magazine (PDK International)

I’ve always preferred having blinds or curtains covering the windows in my home — at least the windows that face the street or my neighbors. I don’t want just anybody peeking into my house.

But the windows of my home office are only partly covered, allowing light to stream in and brighten the room and to let me look out to watch cardinals perch in nearby trees.

And, because I live in a three-story house, I have a few windows up high that aren’t covered at all, which allows me to look out over the evergreens and maple trees without any worry about nosy neighbors peering into my private space.

I’m guessing that most folks are like me — picking and choosing the times and places where we value our privacy and the times and places where we’re willing to open up a little because of the benefit we’ll gain by being a little less protective ...

By Brian Lewis, CEO, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

When it comes to meeting the needs of students, educators have aspirational goals. They passionately maintain a positive vision for what each student can become. Educators and school leaders know one size does not fit all. As such, many of them have a number of different learning and teaching strategies to reach every child. The same cannot typically be said for the delivery of professional learning for educators.

As Congress takes steps to reauthorize the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (more recently referred to as No Child Left Behind), the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) is calling upon leaders to include the Enhancing Education Through Technology Act of 2015 (EETT15) in the final bill.

When it comes to professional learning for educators, the approach too often adheres to the “sage-on-the-stage” method. Educators are expected to sit through one-time workshops or lengthened faculty meetings for passive professional development ...

By Sharon P. Robinson, President and CEO, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE)

This week, the White House announced a new push to protect students’ digital privacy, as ever-expanding data collection efforts heighten concerns from parents and advocacy groups about appropriate uses of the data. Institutions of higher education share the administration’s priority of protecting elementary and secondary students and upholding diligent safety and privacy practices in preparing teachers for the classroom. Ultimately, safeguarding student data is everyone’s business. ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

The 2014-15 AASA International Seminar, under the auspices of the People to People Ambassador Program, took us to Australia and New Zealand. Both countries have a reputation for quality education, and the participants, including AASA President David Pennington and Past President Amy Sichel, were eager to experience whether the hype was deserved.

The Australian government provides funding for all of its schools, be they public or private. We visited with Judith Poole, headmistress of the Abbotsleigh School, an independent Anglican girls’ school serving 1,400 students preschool to grade 12. Poole comes from New Jersey, but she traveled to Australia 18 years ago with her husband, and they remained. Today she runs what is undoubtedly one of the best schools in the country. ...

Tarsi Dunlop's picture

STEM for All Kids

STEM is far more nuanced than the acronym suggests. At an early December NCTET-sponsored event at Discovery Education headquarters, the focus was on the importance of STEM in teaching and learning.

Science, technology, engineering and math aren’t just for individuals who already excel in the subjects; STEM can be for all students in all classes. And it really isn’t about excelling in key subjects, but a mindset that can be infused across a curriculum. In school, STEM helps students see what they can be, what they can do, and what problems they can solve. You can’t be what you can’t see, and STEM learning is a logical connection to the real world opportunities students can pursue in their future careers.  ...

By Craig Thibaudeau, Chief External Relations Officer, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

On Thursday (Dec. 11), the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will consider a proposal by FCC Chairman Tom Wheeler to allocate more funding to support schools across the country that need to modernize the technology infrastructure for digital learning. ISTE applauds Chairman Wheeler for his bold leadership to invest in education. His proposal to make an additional $1.5 billion in E-Rate funds available to schools and libraries to pay for fiber-optic lines, Wi-Fi access points and the cost of internet service is worthy of support by the entire commission.

The vote by the FCC on Thursday goes beyond simply making more funds available for reliable and fast connectivity. A vote for the chairman’s proposal is a vote for digital learning, equity of access and an investment in teachers.

For Loretta Robinson, a superintendent in Miami, Oklahoma, increasing the on-going E-Rate support is about access to digital learning. “Access to high-speed broadband is the key to allowing modern learning and teaching in schools across the country. Miami is a rural community with limitations in curriculum offerings. It is imperative that our students have digital learning available. It is also imperative [that] our teachers have access to online resources for students’ learning, as well as their own,” said Robinson ...

Earlier this week, I was fortunate to have an invitation to the White House to attend the President Obama’s announcement of the Future Ready Schools Initiative as part of the administration’s ConnectED program. One hundred school superintendents were also in the audience as part of the first-ever Superintendents’ Summit at the White House, which served as the kickoff to the initiative. During the ceremony the superintendents signed a pledge – on their tablets – that proclaimed their commitment to ensuring their districts were Future Ready with broadband connections to the classroom, digital content for their students, devices to support the curriculum materials and professional development for their teachers so they are supported in using technology effectively for teaching and learning activities.

What this part of the administration’s ConnectED initiative recognizes is that leadership counts when change is happening. I couldn’t agree more, and it’s my hope that all the efforts being put forth by the education leaders in the room and across the country, whether a pledge is signed or not, are successful in bringing innovation supported with appropriate technology to every school and every classroom. The elephant in the room is that these sorts of photo op ceremonies and initiatives around bringing technology into public schooling have been taking place for more than twenty years ...

In October, we at the Learning First Alliance (LFA) hosted #CCSSteach, a Twitter Town Hall on “Teaching in a Common Core World,” which provided a forum for teachers, administrators and education leaders impacted by the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to share their stories about using Common Core in the classroom and how students are adapting to new CCSS-aligned curriculum.

During that discussion it became clear that technology is playing a large role in Common Core implementation. While at the national level, some equate technology and the Common Core only in the sense that progress against these standards is to be measured online, those in field see something bigger. In many communities, technology is playing a major role in how students interact with the standards in the classroom (and at home) and in how educators connect, learn, collaborate and plan on behalf of their students.

To gain insight as to what technology is working best when it comes to implementation and to learn where additional supports are needed, on November 19 we teamed up with the International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE) to host #CCSStech, a Twitter Town Hall on “Ed Tech in a Common Core World."

A few key themes emerged from this conversation. Overall, participants (including teachers, technology directors and representatives of national organizations, among others) indicated that: ...

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