Join the conversation

...about what is working in our public schools.

Healthy Kids

Blog Entries

By Rebecca Ralston, Manager of Youth Leadership

On Tuesday, March 25, Special Olympics Project UNIFY staff, along with youth leaders and educators from across the country, presented to the Department of Education on the power and growth of Project UNIFY over the last year. Special Olympics athlete and youth leader Kabir Robinson from Special Olympics Washington joined Delaware youth leader Connor Moore and educators Erin Trzcinski and Tom Ledcke, from Delaware and Washington, respectively, to share their personal experiences with Project UNIFY.

Kabir’s impactful remarks are below, and you can watch the entire presentation here.

Introductory Remarks

Hi everyone. My name is Kabir Robinson. I live in Seattle, Washington. I am a member of the National Youth Activation Committee. I have been involved with Special Olympics for 3 to 4 years. I joined because I just want to be treated equally and be happy. I also want to be a better leader in sports. ...

By Gail Connelly, Executive Director, National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP)

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson stood before Congress and the nation and declared an “unconditional” war on poverty in America. His Economic Opportunity Act promised a better life to those living “on the outskirts of hope,” and at the heart of that promise was education.

Sadly, the decades since have produced an even greater gulf between rich and poor, between the haves and the have-nots, between the well-educated and the poorly educated. And the hardest-hit victims of this failure to eradicate poverty are our nation’s children.

A 2013 Educational Testing Service (ETS) report, Poverty and Education: Finding the Way Forward, clarifies just how widespread and damaging the condition of poverty is for children. It reminds us that in addition to communities where generational poverty is baked into the culture, there is a fresh class of situational poor, casualties of the new century’s housing and employment downturns.

The report reveals that 22 percent, or one-fifth, of American children are living in poverty, and 2.8 million of those live in “extreme poverty” on less than $2 a day. The report also reiterates that poverty engenders numerous related disadvantages, including growing up in single-parent homes, being exposed to toxins that lead to health issues, food insecurity, and ...

By Anne Foster, Executive Director, Parents for Public Schools (PPS)

The story out of Uintah Elementary School in the Salt Lake City School District grabbed more than few hearts recently. Children going through the lunch line whose accounts were low had their lunches taken away.  Some thirty to forty students were impacted. They were given fruit and milk, and the confiscated lunches were thrown away. The district said it had started notifying parents about the accounts earlier in the week, but some parents said they had not been contacted.

It’s difficult and painful to see this happen in a public school in America. We believe, and most of the time we’re right, that public school teachers and officials who teach and care for our children every day are kind and that they use good judgment and common sense when they dispense that kindness. It’s hard to square that with what happened in Utah. The district has since apologized and corrected the problem. Surrounding districts were quick to point out how they deal with this issue – by working with parents individually and by giving parents the ability to pay on their mobile devices. Various stories and actions have followed this story. One was a heartwarming story of a man in Houston who ...

By Libby Nealis, Behavioral Health Consultant, NEA Health Information Network

, NEA Health Information Network

When suicide is the third leading cause of death among youth as young as 10 through age 19, it is crucial that our school districts have proactive suicide prevention policies in place.

Anytime we lose a young person to suicide is one time too many.  Tragically, most of today’s school shootings end not only in injury and death of innocent students and school staff, but also in the ultimate self-inflicted gun shots and suicide of the perpetrators of these violent events.  Therefore, our efforts to reduce school and community violence and ensure student and staff safety in our schools must also include an understanding of suicide prevention and what is involved in the identification and referral of students at risk of suicide.  ...

NEA strongly encourages members to include suicide prevention, alertness, and intervention and postvention programs in the ongoing professional development and educator preparation programs for teachers, education support professionals, and

Written by Eyang Garrison, Child Nutrition Policy Analyst, FRAC, for the National PTA's One Voice blog

Imagine being able to send your children to school every day knowing that they will receive a healthy breakfast in the classroom at no charge at the start of the school day. Imagine what that would mean for your family’s monthly budget and the positive effects it would have on your child’s ability to learn and focus during morning instruction.

Free school breakfast for all students regardless of their family income level is fast becoming a reality for families with children in high-poverty schools across the country.

As parents, you know that the morning hustle doesn’t always provide time for your children to eat breakfast before heading off to school. Long commutes and non-traditional work hours often make it difficult to sit down in the morning long enough to eat a nutritious breakfast. Additionally, many families are living on very tight budgets and can ill afford to buy breakfast at school.

School breakfast can be a big help for families, but the traditional school breakfast model, where breakfast is served in the cafeteria, just misses too many kids due to a variety of factors. When given a choice, students will almost always choose to play with their friends outside or ...

Robin Zorn is the American School Counselor Association's 2014 School Counselor of the Year. Ms. Zorn works at Mason Elementary School in Gwinnett County. She's tireless in her efforts to help some of our youngest students gain a strong foundation to build on for the rest of their academic career. By emphasizing both social-emotional well-being and college-and-career readiness, Ms.Zorn and her team at Mason Elementary empower children to dream and plan for their future while providing them the necessary supports to succeed. We're thrilled to highlight Ms.Zorn on our site as a representative for the great work being done by school counselors across the country.

Question: How long have you been a school counselor?

I started in 1994, so this is my 20th year.

Question: At what levels have you worked (elementary school, middle school, high school)?

I did my internship in the middle school, but I have been in elementary the entire 20 years.

Question: What led you to become a school counselor? ...

By Libby Nealis, Project Consultant, NEA Health Information Network

The problem of prescription drug misuse and abuse by adults has been growing for years, but its recent increase within the adolescent population is alarming.  According to a 2010 survey, one in four adolescents has abused a prescription medication at some point in their lives, which is up from one in five teens in 2009.

In growing numbers, more adolescents are abusing prescription drugs than they are illegal drugs.  With the exception of marijuana, prescription drugs are the drug of choice among 12-13 year olds.  The prescription drugs that teens most commonly abuse or misuse are painkillers, stimulants (like medications taken for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD) and depressants (like anti-anxiety medications).  These medications are often easily accessible, sometimes from a parent’s medicine cabinet.  In fact, 64% of teens (age 12-17) who abuse prescription pain relievers say they got them from friends or relatives.

Schools can play an important role in combatting this growing and dangerous trend.  All educators, particularly those who most frequently work with at-risk populations, should be aware of the changing patterns of prescription drug misuse and abuse within ...

School discipline policies often promote a zero tolerance approach that disproportionately, and negatively, affects minority children. Pushing students out of the building for behavioral infractions is not the answer; instead, policies should prioritize programs and actions that create safe environments for students to learn and thrive. Zero tolerance is easy, but it is not a real solution because it actually funnels many students towards the cracks, letting them fall through with little ability to pull them back. Yet many schools lack comprehensive alternative courses of action. Schools and states need to revise their approach to school discipline if they truly wish to leave no child behind. ...

By Jamila Goodman, Program Coordinator, NEA Health Information Network

Did you know that adolescents are more likely than young adults to become dependent on prescription medication?  The Office of National Drug Control Policy calls prescription drug abuse “the Nation’s fastest growing drug problem.” The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has classified prescription drug abuse as an epidemic. The problem of prescription drug abuse and misuse is particularly alarming among young people. ...

National PTA's Every Child in Focus is a campaign to strengthen family engagement in schools by celebrating the achievements and reporting the disparities within diverse populations, and sharing resources and advocacy tools to help understand the needs of every child. January is the Month of the Suburban Child. Guest blogging for National PTA is Elizabeth Kneebone, a fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings. Her work primarily focuses on urban and suburban poverty, metropolitan demographics, and tax policies that support low-income workers and communities. To learn more, visit PTA.org/EveryChild

Mapleton Public Schools—a suburban district just north of Denver, Colorado—serves more than 7,600 students from Pre-K through grade 12 in its 15 schools. Though its enrollment numbers have remained steady in recent years, this district has been grappling with significant changes. In the span of a decade, the number of Mapleton students eligible for free and reduced-price lunch doubled. By the 2010-11 school year, more than two-thirds (68 percent) of the student body was eligible for subsidized meals. As the number of low-income students has climbed, so too has the need for extra assistance that will help kids be ready to learn—from clothing and food to additional academic support.

Mapleton Public Schools isn’t alone. Suburban districts across the nation’s 100 largest metro areas have become home to growing low-income populations in recent years. In the last half of the 2000s, the number of suburban students eligible for free and reduced-price lunches grew by 22 percent, compared to an increase of just 8 percent in city districts during that time. At the same time, many school districts are also seeing more students experiencing homelessness.

These trends reflect larger shifts in the geography of poverty within the nation’s largest metro areas. Between 2000 and 2012, the population living below the federal poverty line in the suburbs (roughly $23,500 for a family of four in 2012) grew by 65 percent—more than twice the pace of growth in large cities and faster than the increases registered in smaller metro areas and ...

Syndicate content