Join the conversation

...about what is working in our public schools.

Equity

Blog Entries

By Nora Carr, APR, President, National School Public Relations Association (NSPRA) and Chief of Staff, Guilford County Schools, Greensboro, NC*

With child poverty rising nationwide and public education under constant attack, working in school public relations can get discouraging. Then something comes along that reminds us why we do what we do. Sometimes it’s a photograph; sometimes it’s a story. It may be an event, film clip, quote, poem, or even a news segment.

In Joplin, MO, it’s a young boy experiencing his brand new school in what once was a storm ravaged community, exclaiming: “It feels like happiness.” And, it’s a visionary superintendent who kept pushing for a “bigger, better” Joplin when many felt a more modest standard would suffice. 

In Jamestown, NC, it’s a school hosting a parade and surprise party for a 97-year-old volunteer who found new purpose helping medically fragile children. And it’s every news outlet in town coming out to cheer everyone on, the look of pure joy radiating from every crevice on the volunteer’s face as he hugs one of his kids.

In Haughton, LA, it’s a teenager who wows the crowd as part of the team’s color guard, twirling flags with precision to the beat of music she can’t hear. And, it’s her determination to pursue a position on the flag team in college, and the public school that made her inclusive education possible.

In Sanger, CA, it’s a young girl who arrives from Mexico at age five not speaking any English and then graduates as her high school’s valedictorian, despite working nearly fulltime as ...

The latest release of international test results has once again stirred the controversy of whether or not American students can successfully compete academically in a global context. Before we condemn our educational system, however, we must first understand exactly what the Program for International Student Assessment (PISA) reveals about student performance and whether a fair comparison can be made between American 15-year-olds and those in other countries.

Between 2009 and 2013, the performance of American students on PISA did not change. Overall, U.S. teens were found to be very good at basic tasks, but they fell short when engaging in critical thinking and deeper learning. PISA also shows that even though the United States has slightly closed the achievement gap for poor or disadvantaged children, the U.S. gap is still much larger than in most top-performing countries. (These findings are consistent with previous results on state summative assessments and the National Assessment of Educational Progress.) Further, the PISA analysis suggests that schools should focus more attention on developing students’ analytical skills in concert with state summative assessments. It also speaks to the need for more equitable distribution of ...

By Kwok-Sze Wong, Ed.D, Executive Director, American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

Like millions of immigrants, my parents came to America with the hope that their children would have better lives than they themselves had. The very foundation of the American Dream is the belief that people can be upwardly mobile despite their parents’ social and economic standing. Although many immigrant and low-income families struggle, those of us in the margins always believed we had the opportunity to join the middle class. Sadly, this is increasingly less true.

The United States continues to have the world’s largest gross domestic product (GDP) and more millionaires and billionaires than any other country. Unfortunately, the number of people living in poverty in the United States is also among the highest in world. The wealth gap has been steadily growing for more than a decade as the middle class continues to decline.

President Obama has called income inequality “the defining challenge of our time.” Although some conservative politicians contend there is no inequality, people on both sides of the political aisle agree on one factor crucial for improving Americans lives and mobility: education. ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

Next week (Jan. 27-31) is National School Choice Week, a campaign whose sponsors include proponents of vouchers, charters, magnets and other schools, though the real focus is on vouchers. When it comes to school choice and vouchers at AASA, we are deeply committed to supporting and strengthening the nation’s public schools, and have an absolute belief that public dollars are for public schools and equally strong opposition to vouchers.

We are very engaged in advocacy efforts to oppose federal education policy supporting vouchers. AASA is involved with the National Coalition for Public Education, a coalition of more than 50 education, civic, civil rights and religious organizations. NCPE brings these groups together in their common belief that maintaining strong public schools, which are open and nondiscriminatory in their acceptance of all students, is essential to preserving critical American values and ensuring our nation’s ...

National PTA's Every Child in Focus is a campaign to strengthen family engagement in schools by celebrating the achievements and reporting the disparities within diverse populations, and sharing resources and advocacy tools to help understand the needs of every child. January is the Month of the Suburban Child. Guest blogging for National PTA is Elizabeth Kneebone, a fellow at the Metropolitan Policy Program at Brookings. Her work primarily focuses on urban and suburban poverty, metropolitan demographics, and tax policies that support low-income workers and communities. To learn more, visit PTA.org/EveryChild

Mapleton Public Schools—a suburban district just north of Denver, Colorado—serves more than 7,600 students from Pre-K through grade 12 in its 15 schools. Though its enrollment numbers have remained steady in recent years, this district has been grappling with significant changes. In the span of a decade, the number of Mapleton students eligible for free and reduced-price lunch doubled. By the 2010-11 school year, more than two-thirds (68 percent) of the student body was eligible for subsidized meals. As the number of low-income students has climbed, so too has the need for extra assistance that will help kids be ready to learn—from clothing and food to additional academic support.

Mapleton Public Schools isn’t alone. Suburban districts across the nation’s 100 largest metro areas have become home to growing low-income populations in recent years. In the last half of the 2000s, the number of suburban students eligible for free and reduced-price lunches grew by 22 percent, compared to an increase of just 8 percent in city districts during that time. At the same time, many school districts are also seeing more students experiencing homelessness.

These trends reflect larger shifts in the geography of poverty within the nation’s largest metro areas. Between 2000 and 2012, the population living below the federal poverty line in the suburbs (roughly $23,500 for a family of four in 2012) grew by 65 percent—more than twice the pace of growth in large cities and faster than the increases registered in smaller metro areas and ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

The National Student Clearinghouse’s StudentTracker is an invaluable service that can help districts better prepare their students for college success.

The National Student Clearinghouse is a nonprofit organization founded in 1993 by the higher-education community to track students who received loans to help pay for college tuition. Graduate schools provide enrollment information, while the NSC verifies to lenders that students are taking the necessary course work.

Since expanding its services, the NSC currently holds records for more than 137 million students and 3,500 institutions of higher education, covering 98 percent of the current enrollment in both public and private colleges and universities. Today, the NSC continues to provide enrollment, diploma verification, and ...

By Jill Cook, Assistant Director, American School Counselor Association (ASCA)

Robin Zorn believes school counselors can make a difference in students’ lives, and she goes out of her way to prove it.

It’s this belief that informs her work every day at Dr. M.H. Mason Jr. Elementary School in Duluth, GA, and her advocacy work at the district and state level. Her efforts were recognized last week when the American School Counselor Association named her the 2014 School Counselor of the Year.

Robin and the six previous winners of the award exemplify the work school counselors across the country do to increase academic achievement while promoting students’ personal/social development and career needs. Since she became a school counselor in 1999, the profession has undergone a transformation from being reactive to proactive and from ancillary to a critical cog in overall school improvement. 

This transformation is due largely to the ASCA National Model, which was published in 2003 and provides a framework for school counseling programs so they are comprehensive in scope, preventive in design and developmental in ...

Earlier this week, the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) released the results of the 2012 Programme for International Assessment (PISA). As predicted, the results show little change in the performance of U.S. students since the assessment was last administered in 2009.

While much of the media coverage of the release focused on PISA’s ranking of education systems, with the U.S. remaining below many international peers in performance in mathematics, reading and science, the education community responded differently, focusing not on numerical results but on the lessons we can learn from OECD’s research on the policies and practices that high-performing nations use in successful efforts to improve student achievement – policies and practices that suggest a strategy for education reform that is much different than the one that we as a nation have been operating under for more than a decade.

As American Federation of Teachers (AFT) President Randi Weingarten said in a statement, “none of the top-tier countries, nor any of those that have made great leaps in student performance, like Poland and Germany, has a fixation on testing ...

Cheryl S. Williams's picture

Learning from PISA

The Learning First Alliance (LFA), a partnership of leading education organizations representing more than 10 million parents, educators and policymakers, has released the following statement:

Today, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) released the latest results from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a test of reading literacy, mathematics, and science given every three years to fifteen-year-olds in the United States and approximately seventy countries and economies worldwide.

It is vital that parents, educators, policymakers and other education stakeholders view these results in context. While the ranking of the United States is disappointing and reflects little change in how our nation’s students are performing relative to their peers around the world, this ranking is only one indicator of student achievement. Other measures show significant improvement in the performance of U.S. schools in recent years. The U.S. estimated on-time graduation rate has improved dramatically since 2000 – the first year of PISA. In addition, on the Trends in International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS), U.S. 4th and 8th graders made significant gains in math scores between 1995 and 2011.

We would also like to remind stakeholders that there is valuable information in the PISA report beyond the rankings that we should not ignore, including the results of OECD research on the policies and practices that high-performing nations use ...

By Karen Kleinz, APR, Associate Director, National School Public Relations Association (NSPRA)

As the nation marks one of our most solemn, watershed moments this week with the 50th anniversary of President John F. Kennedy’s assassination, I find myself taken aback by the reality that five decades have passed (how many times have those of us who were alive then uttered the phrase, “I remember exactly where I was when…”?) and at the same time bemused and saddened by how much remains the same.

Senseless violence continues in our communities, in spite of our horror and belief that we can be better. And what is most disturbing are the incidents involving youth perpetrators. From Columbine to Newtown, Conn., to Aurora, Colo., to Danvers, Mass., to the unchronicled incidents that occur daily on city streets – the list of tragic events continues to grow, and we continue to struggle with how to address the root causes.

Fifty years ago, President Kennedy delivered a Special Message to Congress on Mental Illness and Mental Retardation (note that the term had a different connotation at the time), discussing his plans for national mental health program legislation, which proposed comprehensive community mental health centers, improved care in state mental institutions, and increased research. Earlier this month, the Obama administration issued a final ruling requiring insurers to treat mental health and ...

Syndicate content