Join the conversation

...about what is working in our public schools.

Empowering Professionals

Blog Entries

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

According to Fortune magazine, women make up less than 5 percent of the chief executive officers working in Fortune 500 companies.

Only about 25 percent of our school districts are led by females.

Recognizing that we’re at a time when the emergence of outstanding women leaders has strengthened public education, we were pleased to co-host, along with our California state affiliate, the Association of California School Administrators, the third annual Women in School Leadership Forum.

The two-day event, held in Rohnert Park, CA, earlier this month, gathered nearly 200 women leaders. It was a pleasure to attend the sessions and speak to aspiring women leaders in education. The forum illustrated that more work needs to be done to bring more women into leadership positions, particularly given the challenges facing public education today. ...

By Joan Richardson, Editor-in-Chief, Kappan magazine (PDK International)

“I've come to the frightening conclusion that I am the decisive element in the classroom. It's my daily mood that makes the weather. As a teacher, I possess a tremendous power to make a child's life miserable or joyous. I can be a tool of torture or an instrument of inspiration. I can humiliate or humor, hurt or heal. In all situations, it is my response that decides whether a crisis will be escalated or de-escalated and a child humanized or dehumanized.”

—    Haim Ginott, Teacher and Child (Macmillan, 1972), p. 15

I had expected to write this blog about Haim Ginott’s conception of who has the power in schools to set what he calls “the weather” in classrooms and schools. But, as I read Greg Patterson’s interview with four African-American educators in the October issue of Kappan, one phrase pulled me up short: How does it feel to be a problem?

The comment came from Richard J. Reddick, assistant professor of education at the University of Texas at Austin, who was quoting W.E.B. DuBois from The Souls of Black Folks (1903). ...

The Learning First Alliance's Get It Right campaign spotlights states and communities working hard to get Common Core implementation right. Recently, we did a deeper dive into California's efforts to roll out the standards and are featuring educators' experiences with the process.

As part of this effort, we are pleased to highlight the perspective of Jesús Gutiérrez, Jr, who is in his 10th year as an educator. Gutiérrez began his career in the Los Angeles Unified School District at John Muir Middle School, where he taught English Language Development to 6th, 7th and 8th graders. He has worked in the Baldwin Park Unified School District for the last nine years, the first eight of which he taught English Language Development and Guided Studies to 9th–12th graders at Baldwin Park High School. He currently teaches 6th grade at Tracy Elementary School.

Gutiérrez is an accomplished educator who in 2013 was honored as Teacher of the Year for his school (for the second time), district and Los Angeles County. He was also a finalist for 2014 California Teacher of the Year.

Q. When did you first learn about the Common Core State Standards?  

Gutiérrez: The first time I learned about the Common Core standards was three years ago.

Q. How were the standards introduced to your school and district?   

Gutiérrez: The standards were introduced to my school site at a general common meeting time. The principal introduced the term “Common Core” and gave a brief overview of the new standards. He then proceeded to pass out a book ...

At the national level, we often talk about the political debate surrounding the Common Core State Standards (CCSS). But while that debate rages on, schools across the country are doing the hard work of implementation. And, while you might not know it from the tone of the conversation, it’s “going well,” according to over two-thirds (68%) of teachers participating in a recent survey. Also encouraging: 79% of teachers feel “very” or “somewhat” prepared to teach under the standards.

So how exactly is the Common Core impacting teaching and learning? On October 2, we at the Learning First Alliance hosted #CCSSteach, a Twitter Town Hall on teaching in a Common Core world, to find out. The event provided a forum for educators impacted by CCSS to share how they are acclimating to the standards.  

A few key themes emerged from this conversation. Overall, participants (including teachers, principals, district leaders and representatives of national organizations) indicated ...

For nearly three decades I’ve been an advocate for technology’s appropriate (and changing) use in teaching and learning, and during that time I’ve attended more meetings on “integrating” and  “scaling up” technology’s use in schools and classrooms than I can count on. As one might imagine, I’ve become somewhat cynical about the conversation since the themes and challenges remain the same. But despite my cynicism, I came away with some new language to use when discussing school improvement and the use of technology to support it after attending the EdTech Summit, Empowering Educators to Enhance Student Learning in the Digital Era, hosted by the Annenberg Retreat at Sunnylands, the LEAD Commission and Common Sense Media earlier this week.

First, and most importantly, the conversation was centered on teaching and learning and on building the human capacity to make change ...

By Aimee Rogstad Guidera, Founder and Executive Director, Data Quality Campaign

This article will also appear on The Huffington Post.

“My child is not a number!”

In the era of so-called big data in education, you’re likely to hear this refrain. Education data are, after all, mostly numbers. (I would argue that more anecdotal information—such as classroom observations—should also be considered part of a full picture of student “data,” but that’s a whole blog post in itself.) No child’s experiences can be reduced to a set of numbers on a spreadsheet, and no data policy should be about limiting a student’s options or reducing her experience. On the contrary: effective data use should expand a child’s horizons by providing more information about individual students to help guide the people making decisions about their learning—parents and educators. ...

While the ‘digital divide’ is well documented, studies show mixed results when trying to document technology’s influence on learning for at-risk students. In part, this is because the digital learning ecosystem is so complex. The academic realities for at-risk children, many of whom live in poverty, are also well known. More than half of all students enrolled in public schools today meet this designation. They are more likely to start school less academically prepared than their peers, fall behind throughout the summer due to learning loss and less likely to have access to technology, including computers, at home. ...

By Bethe Almeras, Assistant Executive Director, NEA-Health Information Network

Summer has come and gone as have all the Back-to-School ads on TV and essentially everywhere you look.

It’s back. We’re back. The time is now, and the new school year is in full-gear with no signs of letting up for quite a while. Deep breath.

OK then, let’s stop and take a moment to do a self-check-in. Yes us, the adults. Most of us get so focused on everyone else that we forget that taking care of ourselves is vital for providing a great school year for the students. Whether you work inside or outside the classroom or are a parent – or both! – you and your health and wellness are key ingredients for the school and student success recipe.

To that end, NEAHIN is challenging all of us to take the Healthy Me, Better Year Pledge! Yes, our staff is taking it too! It’s a simple pledge to say,

“Hey, I value myself and my health and happiness. I am going to do X, Y and/or Z to help ensure I am bringing my best self to the school community each day.” ...

The Learning First Alliance's Get It Right campaign spotlights states and communities working hard to get Common Core implementation right. Recently, we did a deeper dive into California's efforts to roll out the standards and are featuring educators' experiences with the process.

As part of this effort, we are pleased to highlight the perspective of Kathy Harris, a teacher in the Piner-Olivet Union School District (where she is currently a Common Core State Standards Implementation Coach with a focus on English Language Arts) for 28 years. From 1998 to 2009 she served as the Regional Director of the California Reading and Literature Project at Sonoma State University. She has done extensive study in the areas of reading, reading readiness, assessment, English language development, school reform, school leadership and professional development. She has also engaged in many field experiences with both teachers and principals, working to improve student achievement through effective professional development, technical assistance and school reform. 

Harris has provided professional development in English Language Arts (ELA) and English Language Development for K-12 teachers and administrators throughout the state. She was re-appointed to the California Commission on Teacher Credentialing in November of 2013 and currently serves as Vice-Chair.

Q: When did you first learn about the Common Core State Standards?

Harris: My experience with the Common Core standards started in November of 2009, when I was teaching third grade. I joined the National Council of Teachers of English review panel. We reviewed the draft standards, collaborated with teachers from many states and gave our feedback ...

By Sheryl Nussbaum-Beach, Board Member, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE), and Co-Founder and Chief Executive Officer, Powerful Learning Practice

Millions of educators and others around the world have participated in hundreds of professional development opportunities as part of Connected Educator Month (CEM) the last two years. Originally developed by the U.S. Department of Education and its partners as part of the Connected Educators initiative, Connected Educator Month offers highly distributed, diverse and engaging activities to educators at all levels, with the ultimate goal of getting more educators more connected, spurring collaboration and innovation in the space.

The official kick-off is October 1, but there are many ways that you can get involved today. This year, the U.S. Department of Education is distributing the event's management out to the connected community. Event management groups (American Institutes of Research, Digital Promise, Grunwald Associates and Powerful Learning Practice) are working collectively with the community, and the U.S. Department of Education, to construct a robust program that will get more educators connected ...

Syndicate content