Learning First Alliance

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Learning First Alliance Executive Director Richard M. Long will join Education Talk Radio on Thursday, July 21 to chat about the importance of involving the local stakeholders in the age of the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA).

LFA released a paper last month that proposes principles for stakeholder engagement for the law, which calls for significantly more input from local school leaders. The new law, the latest version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, requires states and localities to bring together educators, parents, and other leaders to determine policies and practices.

Join the discussion at 9 a.m. EDT with host Larry Jacobs at Education Talk Radio. ...

For the first time, the new Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) recognizes the expertise that educators can bring to the policymaking process and calls for collaboration by practitioners and policymakers – but it gives few details on how those groups should work together. To facilitate that process, Learning First Alliance (LFA) today proposes principles to guide stakeholder engagement.

ESSA requires states and localities to bring together educators, parents, and other leaders to determine policies and practices under the new law. ...

Communication is complex, and tricky these days. And as important to our lives as the air we breathe. Let's look at air for a moment --it is all around us, 24/7, no matter where we are or what we are doing. It is essential for our survival and for our success. In addition air must be of the highest quality - have the right combination of oxygen and hydrogen and little or no pollutants - in order to be most beneficial to us. Polluted air renders us unable to function properly. ...

Teachers are an undeniably important factor for ensuring students receive a good education. But they are frustrated--they often feel that their voices are often lost in the ongoing debates about education policy and issues related to student learning, a new survey has found.

Earlier this year the Center on Education Policy surveyed more than 3,000 teachers—from elementary to high school, in rural, suburban and urban school districts--and found that they most value planning time, collaboration with colleagues, and smaller class sizes. Salaries and benefits ranked fourth in the survey.

The survey seeks to inform policymakers as some states are paying more attention to recruiting and retaining new teachers as shortages persist, enrollments in teacher preparation programs have dropped, and as many as half of new teachers leave the field during their first five years in the classroom. The survey also debunked several widespread assumptions about workplace conditions and teacher viewpoints. ...

As an educator, I love that my professional life revolves around a school calendar, brand new school supplies each year, and the daily promise of children’s hugs. How very gratifying it is to know that what we do has the power to change a child’s trajectory in life! Teachers are in a unique position to accomplish what so few other occupations can: immortality. They live on forever in the stories shared between generations, the unforgettable memories, and the differences they made in their students’ lives. ...

Celebrate your assistant principals’ successes during National Assistant Principals Week, April 11–15! This week recognizes the contributions of assistant principals to the success of students, teachers, parents, and school communities across the United States.

While the roles and responsibilities may depend on the individual school settings, assistant principals are essential to establishing a positive learning environment that ensures each student and adult is known and valued. ...

What if I do more than share grades with parents?

I recently met with two parents and their son. It was a conference to discuss how he was doing in class and what they could do at home to help. If that kind of interpersonal communication is the "Gold Standard" of analog communications, we have to concede it's not the only way we can communicate with families, nor is it the most sustainable. But let's start with the conference and the tools for opening communication. Then on to other options.

Unlike years past, my year-round calendar does not allocate minimum days for conferencing anymore. My single conferences lasted one hour and fifteen minutes after school. To replicate this for my class of 28 students would require 35 hours. Quality communication? Yes. Replicable on a frequent basis? No.

While the recent conference was enlightening for the parents, student, and myself, I came away with two big wonderings: ...

Have you ever wished that you had more hours in the day? If you have, you’re certainly not alone. Teachers have a lot to do and only so much time to do it. At the 71st ASCD Annual Conference and Exhibit Show in Atlanta, I will be presenting a session called “Time to Teach: Getting Organized and Working Smarter” (session #1161 on Saturday, April 2, 8:00–9:00 a.m.) To get you started, here are 15 of my favorite tips for saving time!

  1. If you have a large task that you have put off doing, break it down into small tasks that you can accomplish in short periods of time. Then, schedule them on your to-do list. Reward yourself when you have completed each one. ...

As performance assessment of teacher candidates becomes more widespread and as more video evidence is collected in classrooms, we have to make sure that everyone involved with these videos—and other artifacts assembled for assessment purposes—understands how they may and may not be used. I’m pleased to report that a broad base of educators, convened by AACTE to bring various stakeholders’ perspectives to the discussion, is making promising strides to help safeguard the personal information of both teacher candidates and the students in their classes.

I wrote about the importance of this topic last year (see “Safeguarding Student Data Is Everyone’s Business”), celebrating the White House’s call for heightened attention to protecting students’ digital privacy. The whole education field must engage in this campaign, and AACTE takes its role seriously. Since last fall, we have been convening an Information Privacy Task Force to develop principles regarding the secure and ethical use of classroom video and associated materials collected in performance assessments of newly prepared teachers. ...

Have you tried walking around with just one eye open? It’s tough: Your field of vision is limited; your balance suffers; you lack depth perception. Our brains need a variety of signals to bring the world into focus—and of course, this holds true not only for eyesight, but for our comprehension of just about everything.

Educator preparation is no exception. To help us meet the demands of professional practice, we form partnerships that span varying perspectives. One-dimensional views issued from the academy are as unhelpful as those emanating from the state house. But we find meaning and make progress on the tough questions when we tackle them from many angles at once, embracing complexity as an element that is essential to moving forward.

AACTE’s upcoming Annual Meeting—a convening primarily for teacher educators—will bring in these key viewpoints with significant participation from the world of practice and beyond. Beginning with preconference events and running through sessions large and small, this conference will provoke new insights on problems of practice through multidimensional views. ...

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