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Empowering Professionals

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By Stephanie Hirsh, Executive Director, Learning Forward

Many states have recertification or relicensure rules that require educators to earn 100 to 200 professional development hours over a specified period of time. In my view, educator relicensure and recertification processes are a missed opportunity when it comes to ensuring that educators have access to the professional learning they want and need to help students succeed. Why? Here are several reasons.

  • Educators see little connection between these requirements and the challenges they face on a daily basis.
  • Educators receive little guidance about the choices or resources to support them in meeting this requirement. As a result, convenience and price heavily influence the decisions educators make.
  • Attendance is often the only criteria for educators to earn credits toward relicensure.

Too few states and districts have systems in place for awarding credit for the professional development educators value most: job-embedded, team-based, and collaborative learning ...

By Sharon P. Robinson, President and CEO, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE)

News Flash: The interest of students and their opportunity to learn is not better or even well served by a strategy of constant and high demand of inexperienced teachers. Retention matters not just to teachers but, most critically, to students.

Recent studies showing that teacher effectiveness continues to develop over time reinforce this imperative to do right by our students. First, in a working paper completed last year for the National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research, researchers at Duke University found that middle school teachers’ effect on student test scores as well as attendance rates improves over at least several years. A subsequent study out of Brown University found improvement in teacher effectiveness is indeed steepest in the early years in the classroom but continues for many more years, challenging the common perception that teacher quality is a fixed characteristic after just a couple of years of experience ...

Montel WilliamsRadio and TV personality Montel Williams is promoting the good work of public education through the National School Boards Association’s “Stand Up 4 Public Schools” campaign. And he wants all educators to join him to “stand up, step up, and speak up for public schools.”

Williams recently energized an audience of thousands of school board members and other educators at NSBA’s 75th annual conference in Nashville. He also is featured in new Stand Up 4 Public Schools digital ads as a spokesman for the national campaign.

Sporting a bright red “Stand Up 4 Public Schools” badge, Williams delivered – “shot gunned,” as he put it – his assertion that school board members must spread the word about issues such as how U.S. public schools graduated a record 82 percent of high school seniors last year, including more than 140,000 minorities. ...

grieving boyDealing with a death is never easy, but for young children and teens, it can bring a range of emotional experiences that will undoubtedly impact learning.

The vast majority of children will lose a close family member or friend by the time they are 16, and one in 20 will lose a parent. But while a 2012 survey by the New York Life Foundation and American Federation of Teachers (AFT) found that 92 percent of teachers believe grief is a serious problem that deserves more attention in schools, 93 percent of teachers had never received any form of bereavement training and only 3 percent of school districts offer any such training. ...

Tarsi Dunlop's picture

Black Lives Matter

Black Lives Matter: it’s a statement known around the world. And, because they matter, the system constructs that govern those lives also matter. Public education, both as a system and as a product of local communities, has an important role to play in improving the long-term outcomes for minority populations and low-income citizens. Earlier this year, the Schott Foundation published the fifth edition of its 50-state report on Black males and public education. Black Lives Matter provides clear evidence of the opportunity gap that young black men face in America today – and highlights what happens when we fail to close that gap.

Consider school suspensions. Zero tolerance policies and the presence of police officers in schools are pushing students out for minor infractions. In addition to lost learning time, such practices also contribute to the likelihood that a student will drop out of school and continue down a path that includes a greater probability of unemployment, reliance on social-welfare programs and potential imprisonment.  Suspensions push students towards the juvenile and criminal justice systems, a reality that is now termed the school-to-prison pipeline ...

By Gail Connelly, Executive Director, National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP)

All too often, the life story of the struggling reader, especially the child from disadvantaged circumstances, is a heartbreaking one.

Often not identified as at-risk until third-grade high stakes testing, stigmatized by classroom pull-out programs, given one-size-fits-all remediation, and faced with the possibility of retention, the struggling reader must then continually play catch-up in all subject areas as reading becomes increasingly central to learning. ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

It’s been a little over a week since the conclusion of our National Conference on Education in San Diego. Based on positive news clips that keep coming in plus conversations about the conference through social media among our members, I’m pleased to see there is no sign of a let up in the positive momentum generated by AASA’s 150th anniversary celebration.

My time spent with superintendents during our meeting gave me perspective which supports our work as the premier organization for public school system leaders—enough to make our founding fathers proud.

For generations, AASA has been bringing together some of the sharpest minds in education at our conferences. And today, we’re working harder than ever on behalf of our superintendents in an effort to help them thrive on the job—and create enriching and robust programs that will lead to cutting-edge learning opportunities for the students they serve ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA: The School Superintendents Association

In preparing for the celebration of AASA’s 150th anniversary, I read the copy of “AASA, The Centennial Story,” written by Arthur Rice in 1964, which sits on the bookshelf behind my desk. What a fascinating read. In this column, I draw liberally from the information provided by Rice, a professor of education at Indiana University.

It was on Aug. 15, 1865, in Harrisburg, PA, at a meeting of the National Teachers Association, that a group of superintendents created the National Association of School Superintendents. Earlier that year, the Civil War had come to an end and President Abraham Lincoln had been assassinated. Six months later, in February, the group held its first convention in Washington, D.C. Nine state superintendents and 20 city superintendents attended.

Early Advocacy

It is clear, from the very beginning, advocacy at the national level would be a key mission of the newly formed organization ...

By Amber Chandler, American Federation of Teachers member and 7th and 8th grade English Language Arts Teacher at Frontier Middle School in Hamburg, NY

Teaching is my calling. I can’t give directions without teaching them to you. Sometimes, depending on your learning style, I will draw you a map on a napkin. Other times, I might get you to Google Maps and have Siri talk you through it. Occasionally, I’ll give you only the landmarks—“Go past the 7-11, until you see a Tim Horton’s on the right. It is directly across from there.” There are teachers who teach a subject, and teachers who teach children, and it is that difference that we must all consider as Education (with a capital “E”) under fire.

Policy makers and bureaucrats are attempting to convince the world, who are incidentally probably laughing at how backwards we are approaching this manufactured education crisis, that the woes of society should be squarely on my back. For those of you who might say that I am making taking this personally, let me remind you that it is my performance that is being questioned. Please. Pay attention. I am trying to teach your children ...

Deanna Martindale is a 2014 PDK Emerging Leader and principal at Hebron Elementary School in Ohio. She has spent nineteen years in education, teaching sixth grade, serving as a professional development coach, and helping plan one of the first K-12 STEM programs in her state.

She recently took some time to share her thoughts on STEM learning, engaging curriculum, preparing students for college-and-career, and connecting with parents, students and staff in support of student achievement.

Public School Insights (PSI): Thank you so much for taking the time to share your insights with us here at Learning First Alliance. First, would you share some of your professional background with us?   

This is my 19th year in education and my fourth year as an elementary principal. I have taught sixth grade, all subjects, and served as an instructional coach, working on assessment design and inquiry based teaching.  I also spent time as a professional development coordinator with the Teaching and Learning Collaborative, working some with COSI Columbus to develop an Inquiry Learning for Schools summer program for teachers. I conducted professional development around the state to help roll out Ohio’s new science standards and best instructional practices, and I was a STEM coordinator for Reynoldsburg schools, where I worked with a design team of teachers and administrators to plan one of the first K-12 STEM programs in the state ...

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