Learning First Alliance

Strengthening public schools for every child

Educator Preparation

Blog Entries

What are the first steps on the road to accomplished teaching? Educators Rising is working to find out, and we need your feedback.

Educators Rising—powered by PDK International— is a national network working to help school systems guide young people on the path to teaching starting in high school. Since launching in 2015, students and teachers leaders in 1,200 schools across the country have joined. A recent profile in Education Week notes, “Forty-nine percent of the [14,000] student members are racial and ethnic minorities—a rate that far outpaces the 17-percent minority makeup of the current U.S. teaching profession.

Now Educators Rising — in partnership with the National Education Association — is coordinating an effort to back-map the road to accomplished teaching into the secondary space. The organization is defining what high school students exploring teaching careers must know and be able to do to be on the path to becoming accomplished teachers. ...

It’s axiomatic that experts in a field are better equipped than outsiders to design interventions that will work. Yet in education, we face a constant barrage of external reform efforts that fail to incorporate professional knowledge and expertise—and they just don’t work.

This point is reinforced in recent research out of the National Education Policy Center. In this study, Marilyn Cochran-Smith and her colleagues at Boston College (MA) examine the evidentiary base underlying four national initiatives for teacher preparation program accountability and improvement. They find that only one of the initiatives—the beginning-teacher performance assessment edTPA, designed and managed by the profession—is founded on claims supported by research. With a measure that is valid, scoring that is reliable, and therefore results that are accurate, we have a serious tool for program improvement. ...

Have you tried walking around with just one eye open? It’s tough: Your field of vision is limited; your balance suffers; you lack depth perception. Our brains need a variety of signals to bring the world into focus—and of course, this holds true not only for eyesight, but for our comprehension of just about everything.

Educator preparation is no exception. To help us meet the demands of professional practice, we form partnerships that span varying perspectives. One-dimensional views issued from the academy are as unhelpful as those emanating from the state house. But we find meaning and make progress on the tough questions when we tackle them from many angles at once, embracing complexity as an element that is essential to moving forward.

AACTE’s upcoming Annual Meeting—a convening primarily for teacher educators—will bring in these key viewpoints with significant participation from the world of practice and beyond. Beginning with preconference events and running through sessions large and small, this conference will provoke new insights on problems of practice through multidimensional views. ...

This is an exciting time for AASA, The School Superintendents Association. It’s also an exciting time for school system leadership and public education.

Hundreds of superintendents are convening this week in Phoenix, Ariz., for the National Conference on Education where AASA’s 2016 National Superintendent of the Year will be announced.

I couldn’t be prouder of our finalists. I had the opportunity to meet them during our press conference at the National Press Club in mid-January. In my view, we have four winners. I know it will be a difficult choice for our panel of judges.

One thing among others that impresses me about our finalists—they all have tremendous passion for what they do. Here is what they shared with us about being a superintendent:

Pamela MoranAlbemarle County (Va.) Public Schools: “Nothing is more important than the profession of education. We need to keep elevating that message. Being a superintendent has an incredible responsibility—to see that all kids get the best learning opportunities available.” ...

John B. King, Jr. has a compelling personal story: Orphaned at age 12, it was public education and his teachers who saw him through a tumultuous period in his life and in turn inspired him to become a teacher, school administrator, and now the nation’s top education official.

Dr. King, who is serving as Acting U.S. Secretary of Education as the Obama administration enters its final year, recently spoke about his ambitious agenda with the Learning First Alliance: He plans to push for student equity and excellence, a better equipped teaching force, and strategies to improve the college completion rates. He also will be responsible for regulations for the newest version of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA). ...

Looking back, 2015 was an incredible year in education. The historic passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) is finally shifting the conversation towards student competence beyond test scores, and defines educator professional development in a more sustained and integrated way than ever before, opening doors to a more innovative approach to professional learning.

But who owns 21st century professional learning? The answer unequivocally is that we all own it. Today we are all learners and no matter our role, we must continually grow and model the learning that we want to see in schools. Making 21st century learning a reality for every child requires that educators at all levels learn new ways of thinking and doing. Just as education must be engaging, collaborative, and connected to the real world, so must our professional development. ...

In the fast-changing field of school technology, Keith Krueger is considered a preeminent and steadfast expert, having led the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) for more than two decades. This year, Tech & Learning magazine selected him as one of the “big 10” most influential people in education technology. Back in 2008 he was selected by eSchool News as one of 10 people who had a profound impact on educational technology in that decade.

Most recently, Keith has undertaken a work-study project on digital equity at Harvard University’s Graduate School of Education, examining the disparities in access to digital technologies and how those disparities impact students’ learning, their ability to succeed, and their parents’ engagement.  In an interview with the Learning First Alliance, he shares some of his findings and best practices.

LFA: You currently serve as CEO of CoSN, which recently joined the Learning First Alliance. What would you like us to know about your organization and your priorities? ...

A set of nine laudable principles to advance the teaching profession undergird an ambitious campaign organized by the Center for American Progress (CAP) that launches today. The new initiative, TeachStrong, targets improvements at every stage of the educator pipeline, from recruitment and preparation through licensure and career pathways, calling for a much-needed shift in focus in education policy away from test-and-punish accountability and toward strengthening the teaching profession.

TeachStrong attempts to elicit a common tune from the cacophony of voices across the education sector—from AACTE and the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards to the National Council on Teacher Quality and Teach for America—with a “Path to Modernizing and Elevating Teaching” comprising nine goals: ...

High-performing nations set themselves on a course of steady, long-term improvement, which includes consistent practices for recruiting, preparing, and supporting teachers — that is among the big takeaways from state legislators who participated in a year-long study of education outside the United States.

The study was convened by the National Conference of State Legislatures to explore how education functions in countries that are high performers on the PISA assessment. The 22 legislators all serve on their states’ legislative education committees. (I talked with two of them as part of Kappan’s work preparing our November 2015 issue on what the United States can learn from other countries.)

What they’ve learned so far has surprised them.

Indiana State Rep. Bob Behning, a Republican from Indianapolis, and Arkansas State Sen. Joyce Elliott, a Democrat from Little Rock, came to the exploration with different experiences and political ideas, but they sound a lot alike when they describe what they learned from studying Shanghai, Finland, Singapore, Ontario, and more. ...

As the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and their kindred iterations continue to gain traction in schools around the country, staff development efforts have been bringing in-service educators up to speed, and colleges of education have been adjusting their curricula to ensure that the field’s newest professionals are also ready for the new standards. Nowhere has this shift seen greater success than in Kentucky, which was the first state to adopt and implement CCSS. A recent AACTE webinar sponsored by the Learning First Alliance’s “Get It Right” campaign highlighted the remarkable progress made by institutions in the state. ...

Syndicate content