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The Public School Insights Blog

By Rebecca Ralston, Manager of Youth Leadership

On Tuesday, March 25, Special Olympics Project UNIFY staff, along with youth leaders and educators from across the country, presented to the Department of Education on the power and growth of Project UNIFY over the last year. Special Olympics athlete and youth leader Kabir Robinson from Special Olympics Washington joined Delaware youth leader Connor Moore and educators Erin Trzcinski and Tom Ledcke, from Delaware and Washington, respectively, to share their personal experiences with Project UNIFY.

Kabir’s impactful remarks are below, and you can watch the entire presentation here.

Introductory Remarks

Hi everyone. My name is Kabir Robinson. I live in Seattle, Washington. I am a member of the National Youth Activation Committee. I have been involved with Special Olympics for 3 to 4 years. I joined because I just want to be treated equally and be happy. I also want to be a better leader in sports. ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

I have good news and bad news regarding the President’s FY15 Budget proposal. First of all the budget adheres to the agreement reached by Congress this past December which restores most, but not all, of the Sequester cuts. The President’s budget actually goes $56 billion past the Bipartisan Budget Act, an increase that is included as a separate proposal and split evenly between defense and non-defense spending, to be funded through a combination of spending cuts and closed tax loopholes.

There is a continued emphasis on funding pre-school programs for four-year-olds and that is good, knowing what we know about pre-school funding being the investment with the best return in education. Unfortunately this request will run into problems in Congress, as will most of the budget, as there will be partisan squabbling over whether existing pre-school programs like Headstart have been successful. Fortunately many states have come to appreciate the value of investing in pre-school programs and governors are taking the lead to ...

By James C. Kaufman, for the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21)

“As we all know, true creativity comes from simple formulas and the memorization of data”

- Eric Hoffman and Gary Rudoren, Comedy by the Numbers

I am a creativity researcher. It is both a boon and annoyance to study something that is of (some) interest to the general public. One common reaction from skeptics is that it is impossible (and, perhaps, foolhardy if not a bit deluded) to measure creativity.

I have my ready-made answer. It usually involves the fact that we have many well-established, commonly-used creativity tests that have been around for more than 60 years. But the secret is that there is more truth than I would like to admit in this criticism. Creativity measurement is creativity’s Achilles heel.

Consider what assessment means in some common constructs.

  • Intelligence and personality tests have a major impact on our lives. Personality tests are standard components of job applications. Those who score low on emotional stability or conscientiousness will probably not get a follow-up phone call. Further, many people have internalized basic (if outdated) labels for themselves, taking social media tests to see if they are an INTJ or if their Star Wars personality is Yoda or ...

By Joan Richardson, Editor-in-Chief, Kappan magazine (PDK International)

I learned one of my first lessons about teacher leadership the hard way. It started with a call from a very angry principal one morning when I was a newspaper reporter in Detroit. He berated me about how badly my front-page story that day had damaged teacher morale in his school. Teachers, one after the other, had come into his office in tears after reading what I had written about one of their colleagues. “How could you do this?” he asked.

My crime? I had written a glowing report about a science teacher at his middle school who had become one of the first teachers in the country to earn certification from the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.

I was stunned. I telephoned the PR person for the National Board and sputtered out a description of the call. She wasn’t at all surprised. “Welcome to my life,” she laughed. In quick order, she taught me this code ...

Today, the Learning First Alliance - a partnership of leading education organizations dedicated to improving student learning in America's public schools - called on policy makers to allow more time for the formal implementation of Common Core State Standards (CCSS) to ensure the required instructional alignment and supports necessary for meaningful college- and career-ready standards, prior to tying high-stakes consequences to CCSS testing.

To help facilitate the identification and sharing of best and promising practice on CCSS implementation, we also announced a new website that will serve as a home for implementation success stories. These stories can serve as a guide to help policy makers and educators construct a timeline and execution plan based on what is necessary to implement the standards in classrooms and communities across the nation. ...

Dr. Terry Holliday, Kentucky’s state commissioner of education, shares the power of engaging educators early and throughout the implementation process and the role Kentucky teachers played in unpacking the standards and building great new state assessments.

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Dayna Richardson, chair of the Kansas Learning First Alliance, talks about her organization’s role in communicating the need for new standards, deliberately taking implementation one step at a time and the value of multiple measures of success.

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Dr. Terri Hodges, the president of the Delaware PTA, discusses the importance of proper planning, a collaborative process and the need for the separation of the standards and the tests to ensure progress. In Delaware, parents played a key role in implementation, a process that has taken more than three years.

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By Gail Connelly, Executive Director, National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP)

Fifty years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson stood before Congress and the nation and declared an “unconditional” war on poverty in America. His Economic Opportunity Act promised a better life to those living “on the outskirts of hope,” and at the heart of that promise was education.

Sadly, the decades since have produced an even greater gulf between rich and poor, between the haves and the have-nots, between the well-educated and the poorly educated. And the hardest-hit victims of this failure to eradicate poverty are our nation’s children.

A 2013 Educational Testing Service (ETS) report, Poverty and Education: Finding the Way Forward, clarifies just how widespread and damaging the condition of poverty is for children. It reminds us that in addition to communities where generational poverty is baked into the culture, there is a fresh class of situational poor, casualties of the new century’s housing and employment downturns.

The report reveals that 22 percent, or one-fifth, of American children are living in poverty, and 2.8 million of those live in “extreme poverty” on less than $2 a day. The report also reiterates that poverty engenders numerous related disadvantages, including growing up in single-parent homes, being exposed to toxins that lead to health issues, food insecurity, and ...

Technology can be a powerful tool for change, but in the excitement of doing something new, important planning aspects may fall by the wayside. In order to support long-term success and systemic change, technological integration benefits from piloting, community buy-in, visionary and consistent leadership, and a diligence to build on successes over time.  Vail School District in Vail, Arizona exemplifies these attributes, and the district staff is proud of the collaborative culture they’ve created. As they put it, they do the hard work of getting along, and they’ve established a strong foundation for their relentless pursuit of innovative practices that support student achievement and learning in the 21st century.  ...

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