Learning First Alliance

Strengthening public schools for every child

The Public School Insights Blog

By Stephanie Hirsh, Executive Director, Learning Forward

Many states have recertification or relicensure rules that require educators to earn 100 to 200 professional development hours over a specified period of time. In my view, educator relicensure and recertification processes are a missed opportunity when it comes to ensuring that educators have access to the professional learning they want and need to help students succeed. Why? Here are several reasons.

  • Educators see little connection between these requirements and the challenges they face on a daily basis.
  • Educators receive little guidance about the choices or resources to support them in meeting this requirement. As a result, convenience and price heavily influence the decisions educators make.
  • Attendance is often the only criteria for educators to earn credits toward relicensure.

Too few states and districts have systems in place for awarding credit for the professional development educators value most: job-embedded, team-based, and collaborative learning ...

The Learning First Alliance’s Get It Right: Common Sense on the Common Core campaign shares success stories and resources with educators, parents and community leaders across the country to help them better understand and implement the Common Core State Standards in their local schools. LFA Executive Director Cheryl Scott Williams recently spoke with Discovery Education about the purpose of the Get It Right campaign and how LFA took on Common Core as an initiative.

“Get It Right is our way of saying we believe a strong public education system works toward high standards for all children,” she told Discovery Education Senior Vice President Scott Kinney during the interview. “It’s a complicated business educating all children to high standards. ‘Get It Right’ says let’s step back, let’s give our professionals time to learn, to develop new approaches, collaborate, have the resources and support to get it right, and implement Common Core with fidelity.” ...

David Adkisson, President and CEO of the Kentucky Chamber of Commerce, recently discussed his organization’s support of the Common Core State Standards and politics in the state with the Learning First Alliance. The conversation was part of LFA’s “Get It Right: Common Sense on the Common Core” campaign that for the past year has interviewed educators and researchers who are committed to the Common Core State Standards and are working to ensure the proper implementation of the standards. These interviews, which are now available as transcripts as well as podcasts, show how schools are making progress toward the new standards and improving students’ learning.

In his conversation, Adkisson discusses:

  • The drive to create higher standards for Kentucky students and why the state needs a better educated workforce;
  • Why the Common Core appeals to the business community even though it’s often seen as conservative
    ...

New research on student achievement under the Common Core State Standards shows that students exposed to the standards made faster progress than those who had not been exposed to CCSS—a promising sign that the standards will improve student learning.

The study was conducted by the American Institutes for Research (AIR) with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Researchers analyzed three cohorts of students in Kentucky, which was the first state to adopt the standards in 2010 and began implementation the next year. Kentucky requires its 11th graders to take the ACT test, which provided data for three cohorts of students in both high-poverty and low-poverty schools. ...

One year ago, the Learning First Alliance began a series of interviewing educators and researchers who are committed to the Common Core State Standards and are working to ensure the proper implementation of the standards. These interviews are part of the “Get It Right—Common Sense on the Common Core” podcasts that highlight schools making progress toward the new standards and improving students’ learning. LFA is now offering transcripts of many of these sessions in its website, including a recent segment with Vicki Phillips, Director of Education, College Ready at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

In the conversation, Phillips discussed a range of topics, including: ...

Written by Aaron Brengard, Principal, Katherine Smith Elementary School (San Jose, Calif.)

burnt toastHow Does Trust Create And Encourage 21st Century Leadership For Learning?

Calling all classroom teachers, building managers, or district level administrators, we need you. 21st century learning schools need 21st century learning leaders. While I'm a school site principal, I use the word leader to describe everyone throughout the system from the classroom teacher to the district superintendent.

There is one thing we all need...TRUST.

Across 21st Century classrooms, schools, and districts or networks, everyone needs trust. We need trust in others – teachers with students, principals or site leaders with the staff, and central office with the schools. We need a trust in the process to stay the course through mistakes and continually improve. Trust in ourselves to authentically use and live the beliefs we want. Finally, build trust across the system. The practices and expectations should resonate for everyone from students to leaders. ...

By Sharon P. Robinson, President and CEO, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE)

News Flash: The interest of students and their opportunity to learn is not better or even well served by a strategy of constant and high demand of inexperienced teachers. Retention matters not just to teachers but, most critically, to students.

Recent studies showing that teacher effectiveness continues to develop over time reinforce this imperative to do right by our students. First, in a working paper completed last year for the National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research, researchers at Duke University found that middle school teachers’ effect on student test scores as well as attendance rates improves over at least several years. A subsequent study out of Brown University found improvement in teacher effectiveness is indeed steepest in the early years in the classroom but continues for many more years, challenging the common perception that teacher quality is a fixed characteristic after just a couple of years of experience ...

Over the past six months, Learning First Alliance (LFA) has hosted a series of Twitter Town Halls on the implementation of the Common Core State Standards. These conversations have addressed the time it takes to get Common Core right (#CCSSTime), teaching under Common Core State Standards (#CCSSTeach), the use of technology with Common Core (#CCSSTech) and the role of the business community in Common Core (#CCSSBiz).

Most recently, LFA is partnered with the National PTA to explore the role and experience of parents in the implementation process (#CCSSParents).  The event, “Parents and the Common Core,” aimed to highlight how educators and parents can best collaborate to help students meet the higher standards of the Common Core and provide a forum for parents to share their thoughts on the standards.

A few key themes emerged from the conversation: ...

Maryland PTA President Ray Leone recently spoke with the Learning First Alliance as part of the “Get It Right: Common Sense on Common Core” campaign. Leone shared his experience on building parent understanding and support of the Common Core by engaging Maryland families and communities at the local level through public forums and open lines of communication to answer their questions and address concerns as the standards were being formulated.

Following is an edited transcript of his conversation with Kris Kurtenbach, founding partner of Collaborative Communications Group in Washington. LFA is also offering a podcast of this conversation.

MS. KURTENBACH: Welcome to Get It Right: Commonsense on the Common Core, a podcast series from The Learning First Alliance.  Across the nation we've embraced the possibility of college and career-ready standards and their potential to transform teaching and learning.  In community after community we see the potential these standards offer to help all children gain the knowledge and skills they need for success in the global community. ...

Montel WilliamsRadio and TV personality Montel Williams is promoting the good work of public education through the National School Boards Association’s “Stand Up 4 Public Schools” campaign. And he wants all educators to join him to “stand up, step up, and speak up for public schools.”

Williams recently energized an audience of thousands of school board members and other educators at NSBA’s 75th annual conference in Nashville. He also is featured in new Stand Up 4 Public Schools digital ads as a spokesman for the national campaign.

Sporting a bright red “Stand Up 4 Public Schools” badge, Williams delivered – “shot gunned,” as he put it – his assertion that school board members must spread the word about issues such as how U.S. public schools graduated a record 82 percent of high school seniors last year, including more than 140,000 minorities. ...

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