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The Public School Insights Blog

Donna Staten, an elementary art teacher in Round Rock, Texas, has earned the title "Pinterest Queen" because she has shared thousands of lessons and amassed nearly 100,000 followers on the social media site Pinterest. Staten, who also serves on an advisory committee for the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, says Pinterest has recharged her 30-year teaching career. She recently spoke about her strategies for using Pinterest  and other social media in an e-mail interview.

LFA: How did you get started on Pinterest? How long have you been “pinning,” and how much time does it take you each day or each week to share projects and lesson plans?

I remember exactly when I started pinning. It was a rainy, dreary Saturday morning in January, 2012. I had heard of Pinterest, but mostly in reference to recipes, shoes, hair styles, etc. I had not heard of anyone using it for educational purposes ...

Community partnerships -- are we really better when we work together? 

To Collaborate (verb) – to work one with another; 
to cooperate.

Imagine yourself as a homeless high school student in your town or neighborhood. You need a place to sleep, but before that you want a quiet place to do math homework. Or stand in the shoes (probably with holes in them) of a homeless parent with three toddlers. You do want them to get to school every day…at two different buildings…but first you want to feed them. Where do these folks go? Where do they start?

In all too many cases, homeless parents and students and other high need families with basic, basic needs are confused about what they need and how to get help. They are further confused by the many, many different doors they can enter. In some, the many doors lead to silos of help that confuse even more. Do I go into the school? Do I go to that office or this one?

Guidelines to help ...

By Otha Thornton, President, National PTA

Last week, Achieve, a national education advocacy nonprofit, released an analysis comparing proficiency rates in fourth-grade reading and eighth-grade math as reported by states to the same data measured by the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP). Discrepancies were found between the percentage of students reported as proficient by states and the number of students who met national proficiency benchmarks.

NAEP defines proficiency as “solid academic performance” for each grade assessed. Students reaching this level have demonstrated competency over challenging subject matter, including subject-matter knowledge, application of such knowledge to real-world situations, and analytical skills approximate to the subject matter. Frequently, states’ testing and reporting processes yield different results than the data collected and reported by the NAEP, which is administered uniformly across the nation and assess what students know and can do in various subject areas. And NAEP results are generally not known by students and their families. ...

As California’s ABC Unified School District begins weaving the Common Core State Standards into its classroom curriculum, high school teacher Richard Saldana says the district has learned that cooperation and coordination among all staff is key to helping the standards meet their potential.

The school district regularly brings together teachers, principals and other staff to discuss implementation, then they use those sessions to speak with a unified voice to stakeholders such as the school board and parents.

“We do our best to bring as many stakeholders together as we can, starting with the teachers in the district,” says Saldana, who is the social studies chair at Artesia High School and a member of the district’s executive committee thatguides CCSS implementation. “And we believe that's essential because the teachers are the ones that are using the curriculum with the students.”

Saldana and other teachers quickly noticed that the new standards are much more rigorous, but he feels that once implementation takes hold, the CCSS will ultimately improve his students’ learning. ...

Dane Linn, Vice President of Education and Workforce for the Business Roundtable, discusses the principles and objectives guiding the development of the Common Core and why the business community supports higher standards. During his 16 years at the National Governors Association, Linn co-led the development of the Common Core State Standards.

Download as MP3 ...

By Carolyn Sykora, Senior Director of Standards, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

Growth is a key attribute of the contemporary world. According to Our World in Data, in just 100 years — from 1900 to 2000 — the world population increased from 1.5 billion to 6.1 billion. That’s a rate three times greater than the growth that occurred during the entire previous history of humankind.

Technology is ushering in a similar magnitude of change in new knowledge. NPR recently reported that by some estimates, the entire body of medical knowledge doubles every three to four years. And medicine is by no means the only industry on this trajectory.

So how do we prepare students in a world that’s changing so rapidly and where knowledge evolves at an overwhelming pace? As K-12 educators, where do we start? ...

By Summer Stephens, Superintendent, Weston County School District No. 7 (Upton, WY), and 2014-15 PDK International Emerging Leader

Tonight, my husband remarked on something he read on a Facebook post about the Common Core when my daughter was explaining her math homework. She blurted out, “It isn’t Common Core. It is practice!” 

“How apropos,” I said to myself. This perspective is exactly what I needed to support my theory that the undercurrent and the overt propaganda flooding social media about the Common Core really has nothing to do with students. My 10-year-old 5th grader loves math, learns a great deal from her teacher’s instruction and from the materials the school uses to convey the 5th-grade math concepts. She sees her day-to-day work in school as practicing, demonstrating what she has learned, and accepting new challenges in her subjects. She doesn’t see negativity, injustice, or conspiracy.  The fuss and confusion often lie with those who don’t spend their days in schools, unlike the children and teaching and support staff who are learning and growing in many, many ways. ...

By Randi Weingarten, President, American Federation of Teachers (AFT)

As president of one of the leading public sector unions in this country, I see firsthand and hear stories every day about workers who make a difference in their communities and in people’s lives—healing the sick, unlocking a child's mind or improving a family's life. That is who our members are: all 1.6 million.

Yet, too often, these workers face a barrage of scurrilous attacks denigrating them and the work they do—from sources that simply wish to eliminate these essential public services and silence those who do the work.

That's why Teacher Appreciation Week, National Nurses Week and Public Service Recognition Week—all being celebrated this week in May—are more than simply a Hallmark card moment. These events offer an opportunity. They offer a moment we can join together to talk about the teachers, nurses and other public service workers who have changed our lives in small and big ways. Today, we can say thank you. ...

The following summary was published by the National School Boards Association’s Center for Public Education.

The research is clear: if children cannot read proficiently by the end of third grade, they face daunting hurdles to success in school and beyond. Third grade marks a pivot point in reading. In fourth grade, students begin encountering a wider variety of texts. By then, able readers have learned to extract and analyze new information and expand their vocabularies by reading.

But struggling readers rarely catch up with their peers academically and are four times more likely to drop out of high school, lowering their earning power as adults and possibly costing society in welfare and other supports.  ...

By Sharon P. Robinson, President and CEO, American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education (AACTE)

Today is one of my favorite days of the year: National Teacher Day. For those of us who work year round to set teachers up for success, it’s a special treat to spotlight their work to do the same for students.

How do great teachers set students up for success?

Just last week, we celebrated 2015 National Teacher of the Year Shanna Peeples and the state teachers of the year, whose profiles are brimming with inspiring stories of student-centered teaching. Peeples, who teaches high school English in Amarillo, Texas, described the critical importance of building confidence and of getting to know each student’s individual context and interests. “Every student has greatness in them, and it is the work of the teacher to help them discover it,” she said ...

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