Join the conversation

...about what is working in our public schools.

The Public School Insights Blog

By Libby Nealis, Project Consultant, NEA Health Information Network

The problem of prescription drug misuse and abuse by adults has been growing for years, but its recent increase within the adolescent population is alarming.  According to a 2010 survey, one in four adolescents has abused a prescription medication at some point in their lives, which is up from one in five teens in 2009.

In growing numbers, more adolescents are abusing prescription drugs than they are illegal drugs.  With the exception of marijuana, prescription drugs are the drug of choice among 12-13 year olds.  The prescription drugs that teens most commonly abuse or misuse are painkillers, stimulants (like medications taken for attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, ADHD) and depressants (like anti-anxiety medications).  These medications are often easily accessible, sometimes from a parent’s medicine cabinet.  In fact, 64% of teens (age 12-17) who abuse prescription pain relievers say they got them from friends or relatives.

Schools can play an important role in combatting this growing and dangerous trend.  All educators, particularly those who most frequently work with at-risk populations, should be aware of the changing patterns of prescription drug misuse and abuse within ...

Evidence clearly shows that family engagement in education promotes student success. And the vast majority of parents (and other family members and guardians) understands that fact and takes educational responsibilities very seriously. So when they are faced with reforms that require changes to their children’s school experiences, families rightly raise questions and concerns about how those reforms will impact the learning and life of students.

Recently, one education reform in particular has come under significant scrutiny from a number of different education stakeholders, including families: the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) initiative. Parents have expressed concern about how the standards will impact student testing, classroom rigor, student privacy, what children will read and more. But even in the face of such concerns, one group that has never wavered in its support of the Common Core is the National PTA.

National PTA President Otha Thornton recently took the time to tell us why the organization continues to support the standards and what parents should know about them. He also dispelled some of the myths surrounding the Common Core and shared resources to help parents learn more and support successful implementation of the CCSS in their communities.

Public School Insights (PSI): Why does the National PTA support the Common Core?

Otha Thornton: Since 2009, National PTA has firmly supported the development and implementation of the Common Core State Standards, maintaining that every child deserves a high quality education that prepares him or her for success upon graduation from high school. National PTA is confident that the Common Core State Standards are an essential tool to ensure that America’s youth have the opportunity to reach their full potential and become productive members of ...

By Hank Rubin, Co-Founder, Institute for Collaborative Leadership*

Nearly every facet of education demands effective collaboration. 

If we adopt the time-tested definition that "A collaboration is a purposeful relationship in which all parties strategically choose to cooperate in order to achieve shared or overlapping objectives" (first published in Collaboration Skills for Educators and Nonprofit Leaders,1998), then everything from teaching and learning, curricular planning, building management, parental engagement, school-community/school-business partnerships, board leadership, policy development, and school reform rises and falls on the capacity of education professionals to build and manage successful collaborative relationships. 

One would expect that, as educators, we would understand collaboration deeply. But, as we look at the collaborations we need to lead schools, build curricula, strengthen instructional teams, engage parents and community, develop policy, transform failing schools, and build public support for successful schools, overwhelming evidence suggests: not so much!

You and I know people who are born with attributes that appear to make collaboration easy; like the teacher born with such a talent for empathy that students seem to connect with almost preternatural ease. But folks aren't born with the set of skills, the knowledge and strategic sensibilities, or the habits and intentional behaviors needed for ...

By Stephanie Hirsh, Executive Director, Learning Forward

A few weeks ago I had the honor of presenting to many leaders at the U. S. Department of Education who agreed that professional learning can and must be improved. They also agreed that it is essential to promote, support and sustain the changes we need to see made in schools. But what are those changes? Just as we identify shifts for student learning called for by the Common Core, what are the required shifts that need to accompany them for professional learning?           

In planning professional learning that leads to changed educator practices and improved student results, there are five shifts that must occur. These changes in practices will occur in schools and school systems that align planning, implementation, and evaluation with ...

By Joshua McIntosh, for the National PTA

In a recent address to parent leaders, U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan called on parents to take education more seriously and be active in partnering with schools as we seek to raise expectations for students. The week prior, the Department of Education released new guidelines around improving climate and discipline policies in schools showing how suspensions, arrests, and expulsions can lead to negative outcomes for students and contribute to the phenomenon known as the school- to–prison pipeline. Given this, the high prevalence of out-of-school suspensions in our schools -- even for non-violent behaviors – is a serious concern.

As a teacher leader in New York City, I believe school discipline policy is the perfect example of an issue that allows parents and teachers to work together and prompt systemic change that can improve our schools.

The federal guidance package presents a solid argument for a long-known fact in educational communities around the country: school discipline policies and practices are in drastic need of reform – particularly in the way we work with minority students and students who receive special education services, like the students at my school. The task of improving school discipline policies and ...

By Harriet Sanford, President & CEO, NEA Foundation

They. Love. Science.

Students involved in the Milwaukee Urban Schools Aquaponics Initiative have discovered the power of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics). They do their own research. They ask their own questions. Who knew that you could use someone’s trash to create an incubator for growing fish? This authentic, self-driven learning is contagious and it is opening up a world of possibility.

Their teachers love science, too.

And they are bolstered by an infrastructure and support they need to do their jobs better. A professional learning community meets regularly so that educators can exchange ideas, brainstorm solutions, and learn from outside experts and other schools and schools systems.

The result is a cohort of students who are mastering complex subject matter, gaining valuable 21st century skills, by growing safe, local, sustainable, and nutritious food for ...

By Jack Dale, for the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21)

Since the year 2000, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has made the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA) available to countries around the world. In 2012, 65 countries participated in the once every three year cycle of PISA.  Each three year cycle emphasizes one of three content areas – Math, Science and Reading. In 2012 the emphasis was on Math. In 2015 the emphasis will be on Science.

Beginning this school year, individual schools across America are able to participate in the school-based version called OECD Test for Schools. Participating schools will have a random sample of 15-year olds selected to take part in a matrix sampling of test prompts covering all three content areas.

Questions now before schools and districts are: What kind of results would we get? What are implications for school/district policies and practices? Can this assessment better help us prepare students for needed 21st Century ...

By Joan Richardson, Editor-in-Chief, Kappan magazine (PDK International)

Whenever I visit a school, one question always guides me: Would I want my own child in this school? If it’s good enough for my children, then it’s a good school; if not, then it’s a bad school. Plain and simple.

I’ve always applied my test in equal measure whether the school is a traditional public school, a charter school, a parochial school, a private school, or even a home school. The standard should be the same, regardless of the structure of the school or who’s paying the bills.

And that’s part of why the charter debate is so difficult for me.

Every child should have high-quality teaching every hour of every day. Ensuring that every child has an excellent education is good for this country, which is why we should use public dollars to pay for education.

I truly do believe that thousands and thousands of children in the United States are getting a better education today because they are enrolled in charter schools. That should be enough to make me happy, right?

But it’s not.

In spite of the benefit to individual students, I still wonder whether charter schools are ultimately good for the country.

I especially worry that charter schools are another factor that’s destroying American neighborhoods, especially in ...

By Kecia Ray, President, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

The debate among global education leaders about how to transform education has taken a sharp right turn. A new report, “A Rich Seam: How New Pedagogies Find Deep Learning,” released by education visionary Michael Fullan, provides educators with solutions for how to change pedagogies to foster deep learning.

Published by Pearson in partnership with ISTE, MaRS Discovery District and Nesta, this visionary report reflects on the impact technology has had on the way we learn. In the paper, the authors suggest a new education model that prepares learners to succeed in today’s knowledge-based economy.

Fullan and his co-author Maria Langworthy urge educators to aim the metamorphosing system toward deeper learning outcomes — in other words, moving students past mastery of existing content to become the creators and users of new knowledge. Three forces are needed to drive change toward this new level of deep learning:

1. New pedagogies that emphasize the natural learning process

Technology plays a pivotal role in creating deeper learning opportunities for students, but it’s not enough to simply add expensive tools to the traditional curriculum. We need pedagogies that tap into students’ core motivations and ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

Rumor has it the Obama presidential campaign was so well wired that in Alexandria, VA, where AASA is headquartered, calls were made to turn out the vote, not to the residents of Alexandria themselves, but to their parents and other influential friends and relatives who then called the Alexandria natives urging them to get out and vote.

Further, it is said the campaign knew if a certain percentage of the Alexandria vote went to Obama, it would be a predictor for winning the state of Virginia. The predictive data gleaned from the social media networking were nurtured by the Obama campaign’s tech team.

Whether truth or folklore, the stories point to significant changes wrought upon political campaigns by technology in general and social media in particular. ...

Syndicate content