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The Public School Insights Blog

Tanya Golden, a sixth grade teacher at Carver Academy in California’s ABC Unified School District tells us how her district has used Teacher Leaders to develop Common Core-aligned units of study and help school staff with the implementation process of these new units.

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Richard Saldana, Social Studies Department Chair at Artesia High School in California’s ABC School District explains how the district has unified teachers, administrators, school board leaders and parents in support of college and career-ready standards.

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Given all the debates in education policy today, one might assume that education research is a valuable tool in guiding outcomes and decisions. Unfortunately, this assumption is incomplete because although research is often valued and held up to justify decisions, the research does not necessarily inform the decision making process. There are any number of reasons for that, from the flow of information to the actors involved in the policy changes.

In a recent book Using Research-Based Evidence in Education, Kara Finnigan and Alan Daly –along with other contributors- take a closer look at how evidence research is acquired, defined, moved, interpreted and shaped at different levels in education: federal, state, district and school. In a recent American Youth Policy Forum webinar, they highlighted three major themes that emerged: ...

By Jim Cummings, APR, President, National School Public Relations Association (NSPRA) and Director of Communications & Parental/Community Engagement, Glendale (AZ) Elementary School District

The dropout rate in the United States has reached a record low. Good news, right?

It would have been really great if this story was revealed with a banner headline on the front page of the morning newspaper, or trumpeted on one of the morning shows. But, it wasn’t. The information was delivered by email, nestled among items like your news IQ, how to map the marriage market for young adults, five facts about Indian Americans, and the Turks aren’t thrilled with their national media, but still rely on it heavily (I think we know how they feel).

Within the last year there’s been a lot of great news about education and our public schools. While the dropout rate is down, an earlier study announced our nation’s literacy and high school graduation rates are at an all-time high. Those of us lucky enough to work in education know none of these things were a happy accident. We know they’re the result of millions of teachers, administrators and families working together to build a better life, not just for their kids, but all kids…and for their towns, their states and for their nation. These stories should be celebrated, but they remain buried for one simple reason: they don’t fit the current narrative constructed around education.

Well…it’s time we change the narrative ...

By Libby Nealis, Consultant on Classroom Behavioral Management, NEA HIN

Continuing its commitment to preventing and reducing bullying in our nations’ schools, the National Education Association (NEA) offers a number of resources for educators to promote awareness of bullying behaviors among students and prevent bullying behavior. For example, NEA’s GPS Network includes a Student Bullying group that offers a forum for educators to express concerns and share resources and best practices. This month they featured two webinars

NEA HIN also provides resources on cyberbullying and the prevention and intervention services that can address both the causes and the effect of bullying. This includes positive behavioral supports and social and emotional learning (SEL) programs. These kinds of school-wide programs can also have a tremendous effect on bullying. Much can be achieved simply by teaching students compassion ...

By Nita Rudy, Director of Programs, Parents for Public Schools (PPS)

In 1997 the Mississippi Legislature created a funding formula to ensure that children received a fair and equitable education no matter their zip code. The Mississippi Adequate Education Program (MAEP) is a law that provides the formula designed to ensure an adequate education for every Mississippi child. It was passed over a governor’s veto and seemed to indicate the legislators’ commitment to public education. Since its inception MAEP has been fully funded twice.

These MAEP funds are used to pay teachers and district employees’ salaries, health and retirement benefits; buy textbooks and instructional materials; and pay basic operational expenses. MAEP was to provide an adequate education – not an excellent education, yet legislators have expected schools to do more with less. New College and Career Ready State Standards have been implemented requiring additional professional development. Schools are being graded with a new accountability system. Teachers are undergoing a new evaluation system. There is a new Third Grade Reading Gate, which means that under law students not reading on grade level by the end of third grade will be retained. Building maintenance has been postponed ...

By Diane Staehr Fenner, President, DSF Consulting, LLC and former teacher and assessor of English Language Learners in Fairfax County Public Schools, VA

As you prepare for a new school year, I’d like to share with you a rich multimedia project that was recently added to Colorín Colorado. The Common Core in Poughkeepsie, NY highlights authentic ways six ESL teachers worked with middle and high school English Language Learners (ELLs) to implement Common Core-aligned lessons.

In this project, the teachers designed lesson plans with the support of ELL expert Dr. Diane August and David Pook, one of the authors of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in English Language Arts. Those lessons were then filmed with the teachers’ ELLs, and the resulting classroom videos showcase the kinds of innovative strategies the teachers used in the lessons to make the CCSS more accessible for ELLs ...

By Otha Thornton, President, National PTA

Technology and the Internet have created countless new opportunities for learning. Students can now read about virtually any subject from anywhere and can connect with people and places around the world. Teachers are harnessing the power of the technology to bring curriculum alive and modify instruction to meet the unique needs of every child. Technology is essential for the development of 21st century skills that will help students thrive in their chosen careers.

Technology is everywhere. We text, tweet, shop, learn, play games, plan family vacations and even worship online. Some of us even use technology to track our 10,000 steps each day, like I did during this past summer’s National PTA convention.

Personally, I love technology. I use it extensively at my job. And on my many travels for National PTA, I often use my phone to arrange for transportation, confirm speaking engagements and stay in touch with our state and local units.

But with new gadgets, social media platforms and apps coming out every day, I, like most families, don’t have the time or tech savvy to stay on top of the latest fad.

That’s where good decision-making skills that apply to any digital environment are helpful. ...

October is National Principals Month, an annual opportunity to recognize the importance of school leaders and their role in supporting student learning, as evidenced by years of empirical research. Maximum levels of student learning are reached in optimal school conditions, many of which are the purview of school leaders. Strong leadership is an essential component in creating great public schools.

In an era where public schools are frequently under attack, recognizing outstanding leadership and the value of public school leaders is important as a way to remind the American public and policy makers that investing in human capacity is essential for building strong successful schools. Research indicates that leadership is second only to classroom teachers in terms of in-school factors impacting student learning, strong leadership is important for guiding sustainable school turnaround efforts and leadership matters even more for schools and communities facing challenging circumstances ...

By Daniel A. Domenech, Executive Director, AASA, The School Superintendents Association

According to Fortune magazine, women make up less than 5 percent of the chief executive officers working in Fortune 500 companies.

Only about 25 percent of our school districts are led by females.

Recognizing that we’re at a time when the emergence of outstanding women leaders has strengthened public education, we were pleased to co-host, along with our California state affiliate, the Association of California School Administrators, the third annual Women in School Leadership Forum.

The two-day event, held in Rohnert Park, CA, earlier this month, gathered nearly 200 women leaders. It was a pleasure to attend the sessions and speak to aspiring women leaders in education. The forum illustrated that more work needs to be done to bring more women into leadership positions, particularly given the challenges facing public education today. ...

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